Examinations Under Oath

Preparing You To Give Sworn Testimony

Of all of the different tools Insurance companies use to investigate insurance claims, the most uncomfortable for some property owners is what’s called an “Examination Under Oath”. What is it exactly, and how do you prepare for it?

An examination under oath, or EUO for short, is a formal process used by insurance companies at times in order to gather more information about a claim, to prevent fraud, to allow the insured party give sworn testimony and to prove their loss. Your testimony will be used to determine the outcome of your claim.

At an examination under oath, you will be required to give sworn testimony while someone, typically an attorney, questions you. This attorney, who represents the insurance company, will not tell you in advance what questions they will ask or why. They are also hoping that you will attend the EUO unrepresented. This investigation method should not be taken lightly: EUO’s cost insurance companies money and their reason for conducting one is to protect themselves—not you.

The Barnard Law Offices, L.P., is here to assist Florida claimants with the EUO process. We will:

  • Explain to you how an examination under oath is taken
  • Help you understand your policy and your facts of your claims
  • Advise you, generally, as to what questions will likely be asked, so you can prepare your answers
  • Advise you of what documents you will be required to bring with you to ensure compliance with the EUO while protecting your right to privacy regarding other documents which may be requested
  • Be with you in the room when the EUO takes place, keeping the attorney from your insurance company from asking inappropriate questions

If you have been summoned to attend an EUO regarding your Florida property insurance claim, call the Barnard Law Offices, L.P. at 305.665.0000 as soon as possible to arrange a consultation, or contact us online. We will work tirelessly to ensure that your rights are protected and that you are not setting yourself up for a wrongful denial or less than a fair insurance recovery.